June 16, 2017

The Hidden Addiction

From the basic biology to public policy: in this episode we tackle sugar. Find out what happens in our bodies when we eat sugar, as well as the disturbing tactics corporations use to get people hooked on products like soda and junk food. We then talk about soda taxes and other strategies Dr. Laura Schmidt and her colleagues are using to battle against the sugar industry.

Read more about Dr. Laura Schmidt's work, including her blog, here. 

This episode was produced by Meryl Horn, Devika Nair, and Sam Ancona Esselmann. 



Music attribution: Club Delirio Habanero by Laszlo Harsanyi, Latin Rhythm by SunsearcherAn Opus in Ab, Third in Line, Dirt Bike Lovers, Just Below the Surface, Red City Theme, and The, Zeppelin by Blue Dot SessionsStill On by VYVCHIntermezzo, Lope and Shimmer, and 60s Quiz Show by Podington BearLe Songe d'Hacolhii by SunhiilowScenery and Summer Days by Kai Engel, and El Juego by Javomarin


May 06, 2017

Where Ebola Hides

In this episode, we chat with Dr. Joe DeRisi, UCSF’s resident Sherlock Holmes of infectious diseases. You’ll hear about a surprising discovery that could have enormous implications for controlling - or even preventing - future Ebola outbreaks. One of the big mysteries surrounding Ebola has been where it hides between outbreaks. Here, Dr. DeRisi uncovers an unexpected culprit that could be harboring this deadly virus.

Produced by Sam Ancona Esselmann and Sam Hindle

Special acknowledgements:
First author on the BioRxiv manuscript Greg Fedewa




Photo by James Tinius from here
Additional resources:

Click here to find out more about Dr. DeRisi's deadly menagerie

Here is an example of the effects of Avian Keratin disorder, as described in this episode. More information about this disorder can be found here

The following tracks were from Audio Library – YouTube:

Music:
Darkening Developments, Faceoff, and Intuit256 by Kevin MacLeod are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license

Search And Destory by Audionautix is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license

Lurking, Birds, and Slow Shock by Silent Partner

Sound effects:
Mouse Squeaking
Farm Morning with Sheep
Jungle Atmosphere Late Night
Woodpecker Pecking Fast
Woodpecker Pecking on Tree
Phone Ringing Untraditional


April 17, 2017

Clinical Trials and Tribulations: Steve Hauser's quest to cure MS

Photo Credit: NIAID
In this episode, a team of researchers disprove a decades-old dogma. The result? The first ever FDA-approved drug for primary-progressive multiple sclerosis. In this inspiring story spanning decades of research, you’ll hear all the science, and all the dramatic twists, behind this radical new treatment.

If you want to learn more about the science, visit this link to find a list of Dr. Steve Hauser's publications.






Music Used:
El Fuego and The Itis by Polyrhythmics; Juliette, Submerging Blue-Black, Three Colors, Whiplash String Swell, Theme in G, and Sincerely Yours by Podington BearPalestrina - Sicut lilium inter spinas by the Tudor ConsortThe Temperature of the Air on the Bow of the Kaleetan and Cylinder Nine by Chris ZabriskieI Knew a Guy by Kevin MacLeodMorning Four, Take Care and Snow by David SzesztayTarantella Lucana by Italian Village Music and Dance; Sunday Lovers by Monday Night Fever; As Colorful As Ever by Broke For Free; Puddle of Infinity by Young And Old Know LoveA String (Instrumental) by Loch Lomond; Samba Whistle by Reinsamba PSA audio was from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society

March 01, 2017

Building Breasts and Brains from the Bottom Up

Scientists usually study biology in animals such as lab rats, but their discoveries do not always translate between species. What if we could study human biology specifically? In this episode, we talk to Dr. Jurgen Knoblich and Dr. Zev Gartner about their efforts to create organoids, which are miniature, simplified versions of organs created from human cells. Using these organoids, Drs. Knoblich and Gartner can study how human organs develop and how they are affected by disease. How do they make these organoids, and what will organoids mean for our future health?

January 04, 2017

Rebroadcast: How the Bat Brain Knows Its Place

Have you ever spaced out while traveling somewhere but still made it to your destination effortlessly? Our brain is amazing at calculating exactly where we are relative to things around us, but this is a skill we often take for granted. In this episode, Producer Sama Ahmed talks with Dr. Michael Yartsev about how we know where we are in the world, how we make memories, and how we make decisions. Dr. Yartsev is uncovering all of this utilizing a rather unconventional and totally awesome animal: the bat! This episode is a re-release of an episode from 2013.